© 2015 BY SALSBURY & CO.

info@salsburyandco.com   |   1353 Officers Row, Vancouver, WA 98661

  • Facebook Social Icon
  • Twitter Social Icon
  • RSS Social Icon
  • Google+ Social Icon
  • LinkedIn Social Icon

 

Not too long ago there was an employee who frequented a local bar every night after work. All of the regulars knew his name, and turned to him when they needed parts. Every night he would sit there drinking beer, playing pool, and flirting with his favorite waitresses; all while wearing his company uniform. One night there was a fight, and all of the non-regular bar patrons could only remember that a guy from “ABC Company” attacked another guy.

 

This may not seem like a big deal to some, but it really is. Does your leadership team and employees know that they are an extension of your business outside of work? Their actions off of the clock can be tied back to your company, especially if they’re sporting your company brand.

 

Have you ever seen that TV show about the dumbest criminals in the world? Unfortunately for one security company, their reputation was drastically damaged when one of their employees robbed a business that he had been protecting. The security guard clocked out for the day, and then came back later with a mask and a gun; the problem was that he forgot to change his shirt, and he was caught on camera. The security company lost business due to lax hiring practices, and their reputation was severely hurt.

 

Of course it doesn’t always have to be negative; a parts runner for an auto parts store came to the rescue of a stalled vehicle. The employee noticed that cars were getting into the left lane, but couldn’t see why until she got close enough to see a young man pushing his car. She stopped her company truck, turned on her flashers, and started to help him push. This of course got other motorists involved, and within minutes the disabled vehicle was off of the street. Now this may not seem like a big deal, but because she was in uniform the young driver knew where she worked, and started shopping at her store for the parts to keep his car running. Gaining a new customer is never a bad thing. There was also some great local publicity in the form of word of mouth due to her actions.

 

At work, there is a code of excellence that everyone abides by. Should that carry over to people’s personal time? Does it differ based on the person’s position or responsibilities?

 

The bar fight example from above; would it carry the same weight if the person was a fry cook at a fast food restaurant as if he were a cop (remember either way he is off of the clock)?

 

Every employee markets their employer’s name; inside and outside of work, and with and without even thinking about it. Every action has the possibility to help or hurt your company’s name. How are you being represented after hours?

 

--

 

April Salsbury, MBA is a strategist, an analyst, an operational guru, a recognized leader and C-suite global healthcare executive with drive and focus for competitive markets.  Co-host of The Business Forum Show and regular contributor to various business journals, she possess multi-functional and multi-national competencies with more than 15 years experience in business and healthcare. Her expertise is in invigorating revenue growth and infusing value of lean practices in growing companies through improvements to cash flow and operations management.

 

Fueling revenue, growth and profit, Salsbury & Co. is a consultancy firm focused on helping businesses and healthcare organizations achieve excellency.  Our specialists have executive experience combined with deep functional expertise to provide our clients with services that drive real impact and results.

 

Want to keep up to date with all the newest information and tips? Make sure you're a subscriber to our weekly newsletter.

 

Share or Connect with us!

Twitter  |  Google+  |  Facebook  |  LinkedIn

 

Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Please reload

Follow Us
  • Facebook Basic Square
  • Twitter Basic Square
  • Google+ Basic Square